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Sir Terry Pratchett – Dementia Blog, what’s the point of it all?

Sir Terry Pratchett

The internet is a dumping ground and finding words of any worth in the flotsam and jetsam can be a chore.

In spite of this, Alzheimer’s Research UK – a charity of which I’ve been patron since 2008 – believes more words in the form of a new dementia blog might tempt people away from cat videos long enough to read something of substance. Are they right?

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Are dementia rates falling?

Dr Laura PhippsKirsty MaraisClaire LucasRobin BrisbourneKaty StubbsEd PinchesGlyn Morris

Alzheimer’s Research UK’s most recent study of dementia prevalence estimated around 820,000 people in the UK to be living with dementia, with that figure expected to rise dramatically. But researchers at the University of Cambridge have been re-evaluating these estimates, revealing intriguing and potentially important changes in dementia rates over the last few decades. Dr […]

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When Alzheimer’s steals your sight

Tim Shakespeare

What is posterior cortical atrophy? Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a rare condition most often caused by Alzheimer’s disease but surprisingly, despite often having the same underlying disease, people with PCA have a striking difficulty in seeing what and where things are, while their memory for recent events can still be very good. The visual […]

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Battling for dementia research

Rebecca Wood

I was genuinely shocked recently to get a LinkedIn congratulations on my 16th anniversary at Alzheimer’s Research UK. It really made me think how the world has changed and how we’ve pushed on in the battle to champion dementia research. When I joined the charity in 1997 the majority of people did not know the […]

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Right drug, right patient, right time

Dr Laura PhippsKirsty MaraisClaire LucasRobin BrisbourneKaty StubbsEd PinchesGlyn Morris

This month we’ll be at the political party conferences urging all parties to continue to back dementia research. With no new drugs since 2003, and those in existence only showing modest efficacy, we desperately need new treatments that can delay the onset, slow the progression and manage the symptoms of dementia. Only through research can we make progress and offer hope to people with dementia.

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